DaGrin foreshadowed the street takeover

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The tweet above was one of DaGrin’s epic last words on social media. In truth, the late rapper had a point. His sophomore C.E.O album opened with the solemn self-reflective Ghetto Dreams and closed with the preppy gratefulness of Thank God featuring Omawumi. Though there is everything else in between, DaGrin’s hustle and pain-,from his rise from the underbelly of the Nigerian society into wealth and success-, are highlighted the most on these two songs.

Sossick’s haunting chorus; ‘Sometimes when I sleep and I’m dreaming man, I just don’t wanna wake up’  on Ghetto Dreams is the first thing that hits any listener,but DaGrin’s verses about his struggles are even more skin deep. Music might have been the way DaGrin found an audience, but he tried to reach us in every possible way.

From crime to football and even a financially crippled attempt at gaining a formal education, DaGrin had tried to blow in every way. Only different roadblocks hindered him at various attempts that it almost seems like amongst skills perfected from trial and error in various fields, music had not always been the main plan, it was just the one that worked. Essentially the man was a prime hustler who got back up every time life put him down until he found the success he deserved.

But despite his gratefulness to the supreme being on Thank God, DaGrin had barely scratched the surface of what someone with his drive and dedication could achieve before his untimely passing. This is why we are still grieving him till date.

However, with what he achieved in his lifetime, DaGrin can be easily placed on the ranks of storytelling hustlers all over the world, who have embodied their struggles in different art forms. From a drug pedalling JayZ who has since risen to become one of the most powerful people in modern music to J.K Rowling living in abject poverty getting rejected by nearly every publisher that read her first Harry Potter draft. DaGrin likewise is a success story for hip-hop, the art form that made him. This is the only proper way for us to remember him.

Rest in peace, Barrack O’ Grin.

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